A day without rain

What a busy day at Lyndon! The reserve was visited by several enthusiasts who were treated to excellent views of the ospreys and other wildlife of Manton Bay and the Lyndon Centre. Although the weather looked rather threatening occasionally, it didn’t rain, which is something we can’t take for granted, even in July! The morning began with another moth trapping session – more on that tomorrow!

There were a few intrusions by other ospreys down in Manton Bay throughout the day – four in total! The first one occurred at 09:22. 33 appeared on the nest but couldn’t seem to decide whether or not to be bothered by it!

The next one occurred at 12:46, and 33 got a bit more upset this time. As he was mantling on the nest, we saw Maya fly past, after taking off from the perch! Then in the background we can see her and another osprey, probably the intruder, flying around.

Maya flying past the nest after the intruder

Maya flying past the nest after the intruder

 

The next intrusion occurred at 14:05, then there was yet another one half an hour later!

33 hunkered down at the intruder

33 mantling low in the nest

 

None of the intruding ospreys came close enough to be identified, unfortunately. The ospreys in question could potentially be some of the non-breeding birds we have around the area, or they could even be juveniles from other nests who are venturing further from home!

This morning’s fish was the leftovers of the absolutely enormous trout that 33 delivered yesterday evening just before 8pm. It was huge! 2AN was on the nest to take it, and seize it she did (avoiding 33’s toe – well done 2AN!).

Enormous fish! Huge fish last night

Holding onto it with her strong talons, 2AN sat for 50 minutes eating this fish before 2AM landed on the nest, wanting his turn.

2AN continued to eat for a few more minutes, but it seemed 2AM had timed it just right, as she then moved away from the fish and he was allowed his turn.

The young male ate for around 20 minutes, then he left the fish too. About five minutes later, Maya flew in and began to eat the fish, then 2AM landed beside her and the next thing we knew he was being fed!

The fish was gigantic, and it wasn’t finished that evening – the rest of the it was left on the nest all night. It was early in the morning, at 05:05, when Maya and the two juveniles came to eat some more of it. Here we can see that Maya is feeding 2AM again! It was so early the camera was still filming in infra-red, and as you watch, it goes through the process of changing to daylight vision.

Maya feeding 2AM

Maya feeding 2AM

 

After 2AM had had his fill, Maya didn’t stop and she fed 2AN aswell! Instead of snatching the fish off the adult female, again 2AN surprised us by allowing herself to be fed. Such lazy young raptors!

2AN being fed

2AN being fed

 

33 delivered a fresh fish at 16:35. This fish was the polar opposite to last night’s – it was so small I almost didn’t see it when he landed! Both of the juveniles were on the nest, waiting in anticipation. 2AN is normally the one who’s first in line when fish arrive, so were very surprised when it was 2AM who got hold of this one and not his big sister! She attempted to steal it from him but he wasn’t about to let go, and even lunged at her to see her off. She then allowed him to eat in peace, and he consumed the entire thing himself.

33 flies in with tiny fish

33 flies in with tiny fish

 

What a gorgeous pair of juvenile ospreys! Here they are waiting together on the nest for a fish.

Together

Finally, here are a few photographs of some of the other wildlife that can be seen from Waderscrape hide. These pictures of a water rail chick and a fox were taken by volunteer Jeff Davies on his monitoring shift yesterday. Thank you Jeff!

Water rail chick (Jeff Davies)

Water rail chick (Jeff Davies)

Water rail chick (Jeff Davies)

Water rail chick (Jeff Davies)

Fox (Jeff Davies)

Fox (Jeff Davies)