A job for the girls

By late summer a female Osprey’s job is just about complete for another year. With her young free-flying there is little to keep her at the nest. Some females will take the opportunity to head south early, leaving their mate to feed the fledged juveniles. Others, though, linger for much longer. The Manton Bay female definitely falls in the latter camp; she has been one of the last Ospreys to leave Rutland the past two Septembers. From late July each year she begins to supplement 5R’s catch with her own, and this helps the juveniles to get into tip-top condition for their long flight south. Her compatriot at Site B rarely stays as long – usually departing before 15th August – but she too starts fishing for herself before she leaves.

This morning on our latest early morning cruise we enjoyed superb views of the Site B female fishing in the North Arm. We didn’t see her catch, but she was clearly working hard for her family; the brisk south-westerly wind was making fishing more difficult than the past few days.

The Rutland Belle at sunrise before we set out on our latest early crusie of the summer

The Rutland Belle at sunrise before we set out on our latest early crusie of the summer

In Manton Bay, meanwhile, the female clearly got fed up of waiting for 5R to bring in a fish, and instead she went and caught her own. Not only that, but she even fed the juveniles herself. They are now more than capable of feeding themselves, but sometimes it is easier to let Mum do it!