Ospreys in the mist

Ospreys in the mist

Today started off rather foggy! You can see from this image on the wide angle camera that the visibility was not very good first thing this morning. You can barely see Maya on the nest in this photo!

Foggy!

Happily, by lunchtime the fog had mostly cleared and the sun had come out! Here is 33 sitting sunning himself.

Nice day

The pair have been busy building their nest once again, as they will continue to do throughout the season. The main thing they need to ensure at the moment is that the centre of the nest is safe for the eggs to be laid, so both ospreys have been scraping out the centre to create a neat egg cup. Yesterday the main material of choice was hay. Today, 33 delivered several small sticks and a lump of turf! 33 seemed content with his placement of the turf, but later on Maya decided to move it to a different location.

33 with tiny stick

33 with a tiny stick

 

In addition to the turf and small sticks, 33 also brought in a larger stick, and deposited it right on top of Maya! 33 appeared to get his foot stuck in it too, but eventually both birds disentangled themselves from it.

There was a bit of excitement at about 14:10 when an intruder came by! Maya and 33 immediately came to the nest and mantled to protect what’s theirs. 33 was very upset and got down really low in the nest. The intruder didn’t come close enough for an ID, and eventually left the bay, leaving the resident pair in peace.

Here are a couple of nice action shots of 33 and Maya flying in to and from the nest today!

33 taking off 33 flies off

Maya flying in

33 caught a huge trout just before 5pm, and spent some time eating the head before bringing it to Maya on the nest at 17:25.

Here comes 33

 

 

 

WOW – Day Two!

WOW – Day Two!

WOW – Day 2 excitement!

We began the day with a visit to Casterton Primary school for an assembly, assisted by the school Osprey Ambassadors Louie and Sam, for a lively presentation to the school. W—O—W !

CASTERTON PRIMARY SCHOOL -JACKIE EXPLAINS MIGRATION

Casterton took part in the 2016 Skype calls to The Gambia, America, Spain and Italy, and are currently keen followers of the osprey tracking and the live Rutland Water osprey web camera. They certainly showed their knowledge and enthusiasm, and remembered so much from their osprey school work last year!

Pictured are the Casterton year 5 and 6 pupils and Ambassadors Louie Sam, with Jackie, Ken and Holly, who joins the osprey project team this year.

CASTERTON PUPILS AND AMBASSADORS WITH JACKIE, HEN AND HOLLY

This afternoon the Education Team visited Oakham C of E Primary to give a presentation to the Key Stage 1 pupils. Our thanks for a warm welcome by the staff and younger pupils, and we were assisted by their Osprey Ambassadors Phoebe, Daniel and Arlen who will be keeping their school up to date with the Rutland Ospreys in the coming weeks.

The photo shows with the Ambassadors and pupils of Oakham C of E Primary school.

 OAKHAM C OF E WITH JACKIE AND THEIR AMBASSADORS

 

Schools – more about WOW!

Want the WOW experience? Click on the drop down menus in these sections of the Rutland Ospreys website

 

Education

Information about Osprey Ambassadors, Education team visits to your school, school visits to Lyndon to see the ospreys, this years ”Ospreys and us” 2017 movie competition and more…click here!

 

World Osprey Week

Join in WOW in the coming week and follow the migration of the Ospreys!

Free educational resources, including lesson plans & schemes of work, worksheets with teacher’s notes, games and fun activities for primary and secondary schools – just register your school by clicking here!

 

Don’t forget you can follow the progress of 30(05) on her migration north, plus the migrations of five other ospreys from Finland and America. Click here for the interactive map!

 

Trente en France

Trente en France

30(05) is making slow progress through France! The last data update on Sunday showed that she had spent some time relaxing at a French chateau, and was taking it easy after battling through some bad weather. We have discovered that the chateau she stopped at was Le Chateau de la Roche Courbon, built in the 17th century and restored, it has beautiful gardens and an ornamental lake and is now open to the public all year round. A perfect place for 30 to stop and rest on her journey!

65146092

She roosted four miles from this chateau on the evening of 25th, and the following day travelled north a further 84 miles. We have only received data up until the evening of 26th March, and from that location 30 has another 189 miles to go to reach the north coast of France.

Roost 26th March

Far to go

30(05) is making slower progress on this year’s migration. This time last year, she had already been in Rutland for two days! She might be back in a day or two – we should receive new data again soon, and we will keep you informed of 30’s progress as she nears home. Don’t forget you can follow her on our interactive map by clicking here.

 

 

 

Hay there partner

Hay there partner

Life in Manton Bay has been idyllic for our osprey pair since their return last Wednesday. They have been busy every day adding bits and pieces to their nest, both birds have been scraping and they have been raiding the hay feeder in the nearby field for lovely soft nest lining!

33 with hay

33 went on several fishing forays today before he was successful. Thanks to a call from our volunteers in Waderscrape hide, we were looking out of the window at the right time to see 33 swoop down towards the water in front of the Lyndon Centre. He appeared to have caught hold of something, as he remained in the water for well over a minute, flapping his wings and trying to rise. However, when he eventually lifted from the water he had nothing in his talons, therefore he must have caught hold of a fish that was too big, and had to give up and let it go.

Later, he managed to grab himself a large trout which he brought to Maya after eating his share.

33 with fish

On Friday afternoon the wind was quite strong and made fishing for 33 rather difficult, as the reservoir was whipped into waves. He attempted to fish several times in the reservoir before giving up and going to Horn Mill Trout Farm! Geoff Harries was there to capture the following shots of him.

Osprey 33 in action 2 Osprey 33Close up osprey 33

The pair have been mating several times each day, which will ensure that the forthcoming eggs Maya produces will be fertile.

Often 33’s mating attempts are successful, as the one above, but occasionally he seems to forget what to do, and just ends up sitting on Maya’s back!

There is plenty of time for Maya to produce eggs, the pair have only been back for five days. Last season the first egg was laid nine days after 33 joined Maya in Manton Bay, so this year we could see an egg before April! Generally, it takes around two weeks for ospreys to lay after being reunited with their partner. Therefore we should certainly see the first egg laid sometime in the first week of April!

 

 

Edith Weston Pupils with Ozzie the Osprey

WOW – Day One!

WOW at Edith Weston School

What a reception we had from Edith Weston for our first school visit in World Osprey Week! W—O—W!

Elouise Maria and Sam, our Osprey Ambassadors, helped Ken, Jackie and Pete give a talk to the whole school .They asked them questions to see what they remembered about ospreys from our visit last to this school last year.

We were really impressed by their knowledge about the birds, and they told us about osprey adaptations and their migration journey.  It is the first time we have ever been told about “zygodactylic” osprey feet by a pupil in a primary school, so we clearly have some real osprey experts in the making here!

(If you don’t know, zygodactylic is the word to describe the way that the osprey can reverse a toe, so the talon has two pairs of opposing toes to grip the fish it is catching! Even a nine year old knows that!)

We finished with an osprey song which will hopefully inspire Edith Weston to enter the “Ospreys and Us” movie competition this year. We look forward to seeing them again on their visit to see the Rutland ospreys at the Lyndon reserve later in the school year.

Return of the Rutland Ospreys

Return of the Rutland Ospreys

Osprey journey from Africa

Osprey journey from Africa

How big is an osprey?

How big is an osprey?

Edith Weston Pupils with Ozzie the Osprey

Edith Weston Pupils with Ozzie the Osprey

 

Schools – get involved with WOW!

Click on the drop down menus in these sections of the Rutland Ospreys Website to find out more…

 

World Osprey Week

Join in WOW in the coming week and follow the migration of the Ospreys!

Free educational resources, including lesson plans & schemes of work, worksheets with teacher’s notes, games and fun activities for primary and secondary schools – just register your school by clicking here!

 

Education

Information about Osprey Ambassadors, visits to schools by the Education team, school visits to Lyndon to see the ospreys, this years ”Ospreys and us” 2017 movie competition for children and more…click here for more information!

 

During this week, in addition to 30(05), we are following five other ospreys as they make their way home again to breed. You can read about them all by clicking here, and follow them on our interactive map here!

 

Many thanks to Pete Murray for this blog post!