Back to Africa

In January 2017, the Rutland Osprey Team are heading out to West Africa on an osprey-watching adventure! In anticipation of our trip, let’s have a brief look back at the last one…

In January 2016, the Osprey Project team visited The Gambia and Senegal as part of our Osprey Flyways Project. A group of ten fantastic volunteers were there with us for the first ten days, and together we explored bird-rich parts of the The Gambia and Senegal, and were treated to fabulous views of hundreds of exotic species.

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After the group departed, Paul, John and I remained in Africa for a further two weeks, and visited other places, some further afield and less accessible. One of the purposes of our trip was to record and document as many colour-ringed ospreys as we could, in order to find out more about their wintering habits and migrations.

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The whole trip was a huge success – we saw three Rutland ospreys, several other colour-ringed birds, a plethora of other species, and visited two schools involved in the Ospreys Flyways Project. Plus we had great fun!

The team at Tanji school

The team at Tanji school

 

One of the three Rutland ospreys we saw was our satellite-tagged female, 30(05), who was perched in her favourite spot on the Senegalese beach she calls her winter home. It was brilliant to see her there, her satellite-tracker aerial clearly visible. More details can be found by clicking here. 

30(05) (JW)

30(05) (JW)

 

One of the other Rutland birds we were privileged to see was 5F(12) at Tanji marsh. We knew she wintered there as she had been spotted there in years before, but of course we weren’t guaranteed to see her. Luckily, as we scanned through the stumps on the marsh, there she was, showing off her bright blue leg ring! More details can be found by clicking here.

5F (JW)

5F (JW)

 

The most amazing discovery was that of 32(11), an osprey born in Manton Bay to 5R(04) and Maya, the grandson of 03(97), the mate of 30(05) and the father of the 100th Rutland osprey chick! What a wonderful coincidence that it was him we found! We didn’t expect it at all. As we sailed towards the Iles de Oiseaux, an osprey with a blue ring on its right leg was spotted in the mangroves. This meant the bird was from England or Wales, and so could be from Rutland! Unfortunately we couldn’t get close enough to read the ring. We returned the next day to the same spot, and this time we got it – it was 32(11)! It was a wonderful discovery, and everyone was very excited. More details can be found by clicking here.

32(11) (JW)

32(11) (JW)

 

We had such an amazing time in Africa, and were privileged to get some incredible close-up views of ospreys flying and fishing. One of the best places was the Somone Lagoon, where a boat trip through the mangroves proved to be the best way of seeing ospreys at close quarters.

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We also had several trips to little islands, such as the Iles de Oiseaux and Bijoli island, where we had superb views of ospreys sitting eating fish on the sand, with turnstones trying to steal bits of fish as they were dropped!

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John Wright made an excellent video of the trip – click here to see it!