Back to reality

It has been a lovely day today, and a busy one, too! The late summer sun has been shining, providing wonderful vistas across the reservoir. Although we are still clinging to the last vestiges of summer, the sun was accompanied today by a cool breeze, reminding us that autumn is on its way. The departure of some of our Ospreys is also testament to the changing seasons! The Manton Bay Osprey pair are still with us, though, and they have reverted to normal behaviour again today. 33(11) flew into the Bay with a fish at about 08:30. He sat on the T-perch eating it for an hour and a half, then finally delivered the remains of it to Maya, who was waiting impatiently on the nest!

33(11) delivers the fish

33(11) delivers the fish

Maya accepts the fish

Maya accepts the fish

 

Maya can’t complain though, really, as she could easily go and catch her own fish, and she has been doing this more often recently. However, last week she demonstrated a cross between laziness and deviousness, and employed a new tactic for getting food, as you will recall from Tim’s report on Thursday, when she stole a fish from another nest! Earlier in the season we had another occurrence of fish burglary, when a male Osprey came to Manton Bay and stole a fish from the T-perch!

Halfway through the day, Maya was still eating the second half of this morning’s fish. 33(11) sat next to her on the T-perch, creating a peaceful, domestic scene. We have all witnessed the strong bond that these two Ospreys have formed, and it is apparent to all who view them from the hide. Both Maya and 33(11) look in excellent condition, as you can see clearly on the live camera each time they land on the nest. They have not had the usual trials of parenthood this year, and have thus had a nice relaxing summer of no responsibilities, where they can concentrate on their own needs. Consequently, they have both remained in fine condition, which bodes well for their successful migrations to and from West Africa this winter.

Maya waiting on the nest for fish

Maya waiting on the nest for fish

 

Later this afternoon, 33(11) appeared on the nest and was mantling furiously. An intruder was obviously making a nuisance of itself! Fortunately, the threat to the nest was short-lived, and 33 was able to relax again after a while.

33(11) mantling at an intruder

33(11) mantling at an intruder

After the threat has gone

After the threat has gone

 

In other news, the juvenile Spotted Crake has been showing well all day today from Waderscrape Hide, creating much excitement for visitors, volunteers and staff alike! The last time one of these birds was seen at Rutland Water was August 1996, and before that was September 1987. The most recent record for this area (as far as I am aware) was at Eyebrook reservoir in September/October 2002. So they are not a common bird around here! Pop to Lyndon to see this relative rarity from Waderscrape Hide.