Osprey Team Latest

Season’s end

It’s amazing how quickly the season goes, September always creeps up rather rapidly! All of the ospreys have now departed – there was a late-leaving juvenile who was hanging around Lagoon 4 for a while, but he has now left us too. The Lyndon Centre’s last day was Sunday 10th September, and that evening we celebrated with a thank you event to our osprey volunteers, with drinks, food and entertainment! Volunteers are vital to the success of the project, and we really can’t thank them enough.

This season has been incredible, with eight breeding pairs we have had the best breeding success to date. Visitor numbers were high again this year, over 26,000 people came to see the ospreys at the Lyndon Reserve! We would like to thank everyone who visited us at Lyndon, followed us online and watched our webcam, your support is vital and we hope to see you again next year! The webcam is now offline, and will be re-instated next spring, when the Lyndon Centre opens again in March.

Here is a great video showing highlights of the 2017 season, created by our wonderful Information Officer Holly Hucknall. If you visited us at Birdfair or earlier this month, you may have already seen this, but if so it’s worth watching again!

 

 

Party time!

Yeehaw! We had such a wonderful time at our end of season barn dance last Friday! A huge thank you to The Navigation Band who were absolutely brilliant, and made the evening super special with their excellent music and patient caller! Thanks also to the Roasting Pig Co. for their succulent hog roast and to Patricia Clarke for the bar.

Special thanks must go out to everyone who attended the dance, helped us raise almost £200 on our raffle and joined in enthusiastically with the dancing! Here are some pictures of us all having fun, thank you to volunteer Matthew Blurton for the photographs.

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By the Beach

Good news – 30(05) has arrived at her wintering grounds in Senegal! She finished the 3000 mile journey at 4pm on September 8th, and will remain on her patch of Senegalese beach now until spring next year.

3000 miles completed!

3000 miles completed!


30 slowed down a little as she reached the border between Mauritania and Senegal, probably stopping to fish at the river that separates the two countries.
30's location over the past few days

30’s location over the past few days


We are so pleased she arrived safely – she set off on the same day as Maya, so here’s hoping Maya has arrived safely at her winter home too, wherever that may be. Here is a close-up of the area 30 stays – a quiet spot with an unending supply of fish right on her doorstep!
A nice place to spend the winter

A nice place to spend the winter


As well as the good news about 30 we have something else to share with you – wonderful volunteer Dave Cole has made another brilliant video, this time of a juvenile osprey on Lagoon 4. The video features some great moments of osprey behaviour that we don’t see on our webcam, including the mid-air shake ospreys do after a good bath!

Today is the last day that the Lyndon centre is open to the public before it shuts for the winter, so we’d like to say thank you very much to everyone who visited and supported the project this season – we hope to see you again when the ospreys return in 2018! You will still be able to access the Lyndon reserve over the winter, and we will continue to keep you updated with osprey team news here on the blog.

Almost there

30(05) has travelled a further 341 miles since we last caught up with her on the evening of September 4th. On September 5th she crossed into Mauritania and spent some time near the coast at Banc D’arguin National Park in the late afternoon/evening.

30(05) is nearly there

30(05) is nearly there


30(05) stopped near the coast at Banc D'Arguin National Park

30(05) stopped near the coast at Banc D’Arguin National Park


We know this is a regular fishing spot for her – you may remember she stopped here on her spring migration earlier this year. The flight route from the UK to Gambia goes straight over Banc D’arguin National Park and back in March we shared this photo John Wright captured from the plane last year.
Banc D'arguin seen from the sky (JW)

Banc D’arguin seen from the sky (JW)


With another 200 or so miles to go, we expect with our next update 30 will have arrived at her destination!

I would fly 500 miles

The latest data for 30 shows where she settled to roost last night, after completing day 9 of her migration. She had almost crossed the Western Sahara and was about to fly over the border into Mauritania – she now has a mere 500 miles to go until she reaches her wintering grounds in Senegal!

What a journey!

What a journey!


We know that 30 should be able to cover 500 miles in 2 days quite easily, so it is looking like she may match her record of completing migration in 11 days, as long as the weather conditions are in her favour. We know that Maya left at a similar time to 30, I wonder if she is travelling at a similar pace?
30 was almost over the Western Sahara when she settled to roost last night

30 was almost over the Western Sahara when she settled to roost last night


Meanwhile in Manton Bay, plenty of local residents are making the most of the empty nest. A cormorant has regularly been spending the night on the nest, and black headed gulls, crows and pied wagtails have been spending time there during the day!
A cormorant has been spending the night on the nest

A cormorant has been spending the night on the nest