Osprey Team Latest

Hail Maya

Ospreys who breed in the UK often have a lot to put up with in terms of bad weather. There was the year that snow was still thick on the ground when the ospreys returned, then there was the period of heavy rain in June last year, soaking poor Maya as she covered the chicks to keep them dry. Ospreys are incredibly resilient birds, and can easily cope with the inclement conditions England sometimes throws at them. They don’t always look happy about it though! I couldn’t possibly have a few days off without first sharing this lovely video that Paul recorded yesterday, showing Maya huddled up on the eggs in a hail shower! (The title of this blog is also courtesy of Paul Stammers!)

Lagoon 4

For a long time, the nest in Manton Bay has been the only osprey nest in use on the Rutland Water Nature Reserve. This year, that might be about to change. There are and always have been several other platforms around the reserve, put in place to attract ospreys and encourage them to stay and breed. Up to now, all except Manton Bay have remained devoid of ospreys. For the past couple of years, however, a male osprey who was born in Rutland in 2011 – 51(11) – has been holding territory on the nest platform on lagoon four, the northernmost lagoon on the Egleton side of the nature reserve. We have waited and hoped that a female will come along and join him, and so, we imagine, has he!

This year, his wishes may be granted. A young Rutland female, three-year-old 3J(13), returned to the area earlier this month, after first paying a visit to the Glaslyn nest in North Wales. She found 51 on the nest on lagoon four, and it looks like she might stay and breed with him! This is great news, as it means we could potentially have eight successful pairs this season, and a second nest on the nature reserve!

3J returned to the UK for the first time last year, and spent a bit of time at Ferry Meadows Country Park in Peterborough. She then paid a visit to Wales, before returning to Rutland. This is the sort of behaviour we would expect from a two-year-old returning for the first time. This year she has visited Wales twice, but returned within a day or two and she now seems quite settled on the nest with 51.

Before 3J returned, female 5N spent some time on the lagoon four nest. 5N is a breeding female – the most productive Rutland-born female, in fact – and she was simply hanging around waiting for her usual partner to return. When he did, she disappeared off to her nest site with him, leaving 51 alone again. Another female, an unringed bird, was also seen around the lagoon four nest recently. It is possible this was a bird flying though on the way north, or perhaps she is a youngster looking for her own nest. 51 is in demand!

Thank you very much to John Wright for the following photographs showing the sequence of events on lagoon four this year.

Male 51

Male 51

Male 51 breaking a stick

Male 51 breaking a stick

Male 51 breaking a stick

Male 51 breaking a stick

Male 51 breaking a stick

Male 51 breaking a stick

Male 51 breaking stick

Male 51 breaking stick

Male 51 breaking a stick

Male 51 breaking a stick

Male 51 breaking a stick

Male 51 breaking a stick

Male 51 breaking a stick

Male 51 breaking a stick

Male 51 with stick

Male 51 with stick

Male 51 with a stick

Male 51 with a stick

Male 51 with a stick

Male 51 with a stick

Male 51 with a stick

Male 51 with a stick

Male 51 with a stick

Male 51 with a stick

Male 51with a stick

Male 51with a stick

Male 51

Male 51

Male 51 with Roach

Male 51 with Roach

Male 51 shaking

Male 51 shaking

Male 51 shaking

Male 51 shaking

Lapwing chasing Male 51

Lapwing chasing Male 51

Male 51

Male 51

Male 51

Male 51

Male 51 with a Roach

Male 51 with a Roach

Male 51 with a Roach

Male 51 with a Roach

Male 51 nest scraping 30-3-16

Male 51 nest scraping 30-3-16

51 and female 5N 4-4-16

51 and female 5N 4-4-16

Male 51 and Female 5N 4-4-16

Male 51 and Female 5N 4-4-16

Male 51 and female 5N 4-4-16

Male 51 and female 5N 4-4-16

Male 51 and Female 5N 4-4-16

Male 51 and Female 5N 4-4-16

Male 51 and Female 5N 4-4-16

Male 51 and Female 5N 4-4-16

Male 51 and Female 5N 4-4-16

Male 51 and Female 5N 4-4-16

Male 51 and Female 5N 4-4-16

Male 51 and Female 5N 4-4-16

Male 51 and Female 5N getting buzzed by Black-headed Gull 4-4-16

Male 51 and Female 5N getting buzzed by Black-headed Gull 4-4-16

Male 51 and Female 5N successful copulation 4-4-16

Male 51 and Female 5N successful copulation 4-4-16

Male 51 and Female 5N 4-4-16

Male 51 and Female 5N 4-4-16

Male 51 and Female 5N 4-4-16

Male 51 and Female 5N 4-4-16

Male 51 and Female 5N successful copulation 4-4-16

Male 51 and Female 5N successful copulation 4-4-16

Male 51 and Female 5N successful copulation 4-4-16

Male 51 and Female 5N successful copulation 4-4-16

Male 51 assessing the prospect of two females on his nest 19-4-16-

Male 51 assessing the prospect of two females on his nest 19-4-16-

Male 51 with Roach 19-4-16

Male 51 with Roach 19-4-16

Male 51 teasing unringed female with Roach 19-4-16

Male 51 teasing unringed female with Roach 19-4-16

Unringed female on nest and 3J arriving

Unringed female on nest and 3J arriving

3J, 51 and unringed female 21-4-16

3J, 51 and unringed female 21-4-16

Unringed female, 3J and 51 21-4-16-

Unringed female, 3J and 51 21-4-16-

51 hovering over 3J and unringed female 21-4-16

51 hovering over 3J and unringed female 21-4-16

51,3J and Unringed female 21-4-16

51,3J and Unringed female 21-4-16

51 bringing nest material 21-4-16

51 bringing nest material 21-4-16

51 bringing nest material 21-4-16

51 bringing nest material 21-4-16

51 bringing another Roach 21-4-16

51 bringing another Roach 21-4-16

3J and unringed female fighting for a fish 21-4-16

3J and unringed female fighting for a fish 21-4-16

51, 3J and unringed female 21-4-16

51, 3J and unringed female 21-4-16

51 mating with 3J 21-4-16

51 mating with 3J 21-4-16

51 nest scraping 21-4-16

51 nest scraping 21-4-16

51 coming in 21-4-16

51 coming in 21-4-16

51 coming in 21-4-16

51 coming in 21-4-16

51 bringing stick 21-4-16

51 bringing stick 21-4-16

Unringed female trying to keep 3J off nest 21-4-16

Unringed female trying to keep 3J off nest 21-4-16

3J landing on nest and unringed female raising wings 21-4-16

3J landing on nest and unringed female raising wings 21-4-16

3J chasing unringed female 21-4-16

3J chasing unringed female 21-4-16

Female 3J chasing the unringed female 21-4-16

Female 3J chasing the unringed female 21-4-16

Male 51 chasing the unringed female away 21-4-16

Male 51 chasing the unringed female away 21-4-16

Male 51 chasing the unringed female 21-4-16

Male 51 chasing the unringed female 21-4-16

GBBGull eyeing up the trout

GBBGull eyeing up the trout

GBBGull eyeing up trout

GBBGull eyeing up trout

3J and 51 21-4-16

3J and 51 21-4-16

51 trying to mate with 3J 21-4-16

51 trying to mate with 3J 21-4-16

51 and 3J successful copulation 21-4-16

51 and 3J successful copulation 21-4-16

Male 51 and Female 3J 21-4-16

Male 51 and Female 3J 21-4-16

Male 51 and Female 3J 21-4-16

Male 51 and Female 3J 21-4-16

Male 51 chasing Canada Goose

Male 51 chasing Canada Goose

Male 51 and Female 3J 25-4-16

Male 51 and Female 3J 25-4-16

 

Thank you also to Dave Cole for this fabulous video, documenting some of what has been happening on the nest on lagoon four recently.

 

 

 

 

Fundraising and filming

As some of you may already know, I will be undertaking a parachute jump / skydive on 12th May 2016 in order to raise money for the Rutland Osprey Project’s education work in West Africa!

Initially we stated that, if enough money was raised, we could get a video made of this jump, from the tiny aeroplane all the way to the ground. However, as a charity we cannot justify spending the extra money on a cameraman jumping out of the plane alongside me in order to film this. However, we still think it would be great to get a video made of the skydive, so that we can publish the video on our website and everyone can witness the activity! A little go-pro type camera would be ideal, but of course this option also incurs an expense. Unfortunately we have been refused support from the local company that first sprang to mind to help with this, so we will not be able to film the skydive unless someone out there can lend us a camera for the day!

Please click the link below to sponsor me in this feat, and help us reach our fundraising target!

Click here to donate online!

Alternatively, pop into the Lyndon Centre any day between 9am and 5pm.

Thank you very much to everyone who has already sponsored me!

24N7A8051-2--blog

In Manton Bay, it has been a very rainy day! Here are a couple of videos of what has been happening today.

Fish pie

The ospreys in Manton Bay continue to go through life at a steady pace. 33 is catching plenty of fish, and both birds have been bringing in little bits of nest material and sticks, to ensure the nest is looking its best and is comfortable for when the chicks arrive! Hatching is now only just over two weeks away! In the blink of an eye the incubation period has flown by, and the birds have already undergone three weeks of it. They’re doing a brilliant job of incubating, one or the other of them is constantly on the eggs, and sometimes both of them are!

Both sitting (1)

Here is the tail end of a fish delivery yesterday!

Thanks to work experience student, James, we now know what proportions of fish species 33 has been bringing in recently. James analysed the first month’s worth of monitoring forms, and created this lovely pie chart showing the species of fish 33 has caught. The most numerous is trout, of course, as that’s the species Anglian Water fill the reservoir with each year.

pieToday there was a bit of excitement when an intruding osprey flew over the bay. 33 had come to sit by Maya and was mantling slightly, looking skywards. After a while, Maya became unsettled too and rose to her feet, mantling alongside 33 as they both looked up. We then saw the silhouette of an osprey fly over the nest on the wide angle camera, heading east. As soon as it was a safe distance away, Maya settled back onto the eggs and normal business resumed.

Mantling

Later on, there was another intrusion from an osprey that came much closer to the nest than the previous one! 33 had left the bay, and from the visitor centre an osprey was spotted flying back towards Manton Bay, at the same time as Maya was looking rather concerned on the nest. Then 33 flew in, and almost immediately another osprey swooped past the nest. The tail of the intruder can be seen in this video below.

33 lands

The pair defended the nest admirably, and it wasn’t long before the intruder disappeared, leaving Maya and 33 in peace.

Intruder flying over

In other news, spring is in full swing in Gibbet’s Gorse on the Lyndon Nature Reserve, just look at these photographs of the bluebells that are carpeting the floor in the woodland! Thanks to Paul Stammers for these amazing shots.

IMG_1605 IMG_1601 IMG_1600 IMG_1603

 

Move over

Yesterday, I mentioned how much 33 makes us laugh because he is constantly wanting to incubate, and that he has sometimes been seen trying to push and shove Maya to get her to move off the eggs so that he can have a go. Well today we managed to get a recording of him doing it! He had brought in a stick and moved it about, then hung around, standing close to Maya and looking at her occasionally. After a while he clearly grew impatient, turned towards Maya and pulled at her wing with his beak! He did this several times until she got fed up, got off the eggs and flew off, allowing 33 to sit on them!

Wing pulling

Move, it’s my turn

Maya finally moves

Alright, I’m up

33 wins

Result!