Osprey 30

Female Osprey 30 fledged from the Site B nest in 2005. She returned to Rutland in 2007 and bred for the first time in 2009, raising two chicks with translocated male 08(01), at a nest on private land known as Site K. 30 and 08 raised a further six chicks from 2010 to 2012. Sadly 08 did not return in 2013 and 30 did not breed in 2013 or 2014. In 2015, however, she found a new mate and raised two chicks!

Waiting for Spring

For me the arrival of migratory birds marks the beginning of spring and today has almost felt like is could be just that, with a pair of ospreys in Manton Bay and reports of another one in the area. Furthermore, today we have had the first reports of chiffchaff singing at Lyndon. However, looking at the weather report for the weekend, I think the team here and the ospreys are going to be in for a bit of a shock, lets hope its not as bad as the beginning of the month.

Even with  the miserable weather this morning, we were eventually treated to the sunshine. This helped to provide views of the great northern diver, tree sparrows and water rail. Down in Manton Bay we were treated to four different birds of prey: short-eared owl, buzzard, red kite and of course ospreys! 

 

33 and Maya seem to be settling in very well to Manton Bay, today 33 decided it was time to add some accessories to the nests in the shape of some teasel, not the best nesting material around, but he seemed quite pleased with it! Maya was busy nest scraping and getting the nest ready. Hopefully, it won’t be long until we see some eggs in the nest.  

 

We have also had an update from 30 our tracked osprey, Geoff Harries has provided a beautiful picture showing her tag. She is currently in Western Sahara, amazingly she manged to fly 30.05 KM in just one hour! At this rate it won’t be long until she back in the U.K.  

Photo Credit to Geoff Harries.

 

Place of the Winds- 30’s Migration

Today we have had another update from 30’s tag, from her last position on the 11th March she has headed  North West, towards the coastline. Incredibly on the 12th March she flies straight across the capital city of Mauritania, Nouakchott also known as the “place of the winds”. This might explain why 30 decided to take this route, as wind speed can have a significant effect on osprey migration. Furthermore, she passed over this city on her migration last spring meaning it could be a useful landmark ensuring she stays on track during her migration. 

30’s route then heads up the coast, with a slight detour inland to  roost, before heading up the coast again, on average she is traveling 223.3 KM a day, which is very impressive! She should soon be heading into Western Sahara, then hopefully on to Southern Europe. 

By the Beach

Good news – 30(05) has arrived at her wintering grounds in Senegal! She finished the 3000 mile journey at 4pm on September 8th, and will remain on her patch of Senegalese beach now until spring next year.

3000 miles completed!

3000 miles completed!


30 slowed down a little as she reached the border between Mauritania and Senegal, probably stopping to fish at the river that separates the two countries.
30's location over the past few days

30’s location over the past few days


We are so pleased she arrived safely – she set off on the same day as Maya, so here’s hoping Maya has arrived safely at her winter home too, wherever that may be. Here is a close-up of the area 30 stays – a quiet spot with an unending supply of fish right on her doorstep!
A nice place to spend the winter

A nice place to spend the winter


As well as the good news about 30 we have something else to share with you – wonderful volunteer Dave Cole has made another brilliant video, this time of a juvenile osprey on Lagoon 4. The video features some great moments of osprey behaviour that we don’t see on our webcam, including the mid-air shake ospreys do after a good bath!

Today is the last day that the Lyndon centre is open to the public before it shuts for the winter, so we’d like to say thank you very much to everyone who visited and supported the project this season – we hope to see you again when the ospreys return in 2018! You will still be able to access the Lyndon reserve over the winter, and we will continue to keep you updated with osprey team news here on the blog.

Almost there

30(05) has travelled a further 341 miles since we last caught up with her on the evening of September 4th. On September 5th she crossed into Mauritania and spent some time near the coast at Banc D’arguin National Park in the late afternoon/evening.

30(05) is nearly there

30(05) is nearly there


30(05) stopped near the coast at Banc D'Arguin National Park

30(05) stopped near the coast at Banc D’Arguin National Park


We know this is a regular fishing spot for her – you may remember she stopped here on her spring migration earlier this year. The flight route from the UK to Gambia goes straight over Banc D’arguin National Park and back in March we shared this photo John Wright captured from the plane last year.
Banc D'arguin seen from the sky (JW)

Banc D’arguin seen from the sky (JW)


With another 200 or so miles to go, we expect with our next update 30 will have arrived at her destination!

I would fly 500 miles

The latest data for 30 shows where she settled to roost last night, after completing day 9 of her migration. She had almost crossed the Western Sahara and was about to fly over the border into Mauritania – she now has a mere 500 miles to go until she reaches her wintering grounds in Senegal!

What a journey!

What a journey!


We know that 30 should be able to cover 500 miles in 2 days quite easily, so it is looking like she may match her record of completing migration in 11 days, as long as the weather conditions are in her favour. We know that Maya left at a similar time to 30, I wonder if she is travelling at a similar pace?
30 was almost over the Western Sahara when she settled to roost last night

30 was almost over the Western Sahara when she settled to roost last night


Meanwhile in Manton Bay, plenty of local residents are making the most of the empty nest. A cormorant has regularly been spending the night on the nest, and black headed gulls, crows and pied wagtails have been spending time there during the day!
A cormorant has been spending the night on the nest

A cormorant has been spending the night on the nest