Caught in the light

The heatwave has begun! It has been a lovely hot day today, and temperatures are set to rise in the next few days. The Ospreys have been going about their normal business, and we have seen several fish delivered to the nest today, by the supreme fishing machine that is 33. Unfortunately, no videos could be captured this morning, as the cameras, well the transmitters to be more exact, decided to play up again and we lost the picture for a while. Tim and Lloyd deserve our sincerest thanks for getting it back up and running again!

Fish at 3pm, 29th June

Fish at 3pm, 29th June

Feeding on pike, 29th June

Feeding on pike, 29th June

33 brings another fish

33 brings another fish

Maya grabs its face

Maya grabs its face

Dinner time

Dinner time

 

The chicks seemed to grow in the few hours that the camera wasn’t on! I’m sure that was just my imagination, but there’s no contention that their growth rate is phenomenal. In just a couple of weeks, when they’re seven weeks old and about ready to fly, they will be the size of the adults. They will still look like juveniles, of course, with their buff-tipped feathers and orange eyes. Their adult plumage will appear when they are around 18 months old.

Close up of chick - a beauty indeed

Close up of chick – a beauty indeed

 

We have seen the chicks trying to move sticks about already, and today one of them was seen playing with a clump of dried grass that had been brought in as nest material.

Chick playing with nest material

Chick playing with nest material

 

There is a video captured on Saturday evening that I simply must share. After the day’s activities on Saturday, we stayed at Lyndon a little later, as there was a talk to give and a moth evening to be enjoyed. We watched as 33 brought in yet another fish at around 19:40. The view on the wide angle camera was the best, as the slowly setting sun lit up the nest, illuminating Maya and the chicks, and casting a soft pink glow across the sky. It was beautiful.

Feeding a chick in the fading light, 27th June

Feeding a chick in the fading light, 27th June

 

2 responses to “Caught in the light”

  1. Peter Austin

    Dear Kayleigh,

    You’ve described the ospreys as panting. Their upper throat, like those of other birds,is rich in blood vessels. The muscles around this gular region move air in and out of it and their contraction and relaxation looks like panting. However panting usually incvolves drawing air in and out of the lungs, which are very moist, resulting in a loss of water. ‘Gular fluttering’ is more economical in this respect. Usually only stressed birds actually pant. The other bird you’ll see doing this gular fluttering are Cormorants.

    I bet you know this anyway :-).

    Kindest regards,

    peter