Don’t leave me this way

This morning, there were still three Ospreys in Manton Bay – Maya, 33 and S3. S3 was sitting on the nest with the tail end of a fish, Maya was in her favourite spot on the T-perch, and 33 was on the fallen poplar. It wasn’t a particularly brilliant morning in terms of the weather – you can see from this photo of S3 (below) that it was rather wet! The rain came down with a vengeance first thing, and cleared up just in time for the opening of Lyndon at 9am.

S3 with a bit of fish

S3 with a bit of fish

 

S3 remained on the nest for a little while, but decided to leave it at around 09:30. Then she left the bay altogether at 10:10. Could this be it? Had she gone?

S3 taking off

S3 taking off

 

By 11am, all three Ospreys had vacated Manton Bay. 33 and Maya left within two minutes of each other. Time ticked on, and we started to wonder whether all of them had decided today was the day, and all left in one go. That would be a rather strange turn of events, and it was more likely that they’d all just gone for a fly-about to stretch their wings. We waited in restless, anxious anticipation to see what would happen.

As it turned out, none of them had gone far, and by 1pm they were all back at the nest site – Maya and S3 on the T-perch, and 33 on the leaning perch. The inevitable shroud of sadness that settles when the Ospreys migrate was temporarily lifted!

S3 and Maya

S3 and Maya

 

We know it won’t be long before Maya, 33 and S3 follow in the footsteps (or wingbeats, to be more accurate) of S1 and S2, and begin their long migration southwards. We will keep the Lyndon Centre open for about another two weeks, or until the last Osprey leaves – whichever comes first! There is still the opportunity, therefore, to come and see them in the flesh one more time before the end of the season!

S3 flying off the nest

S3 flying off the nest

 

As well as feeling sad that they have gone, we also feel a sense of completion – another season is successfully over, and the Ospreys have five months of sunning themselves on the African coast to look forward to! The thought of them returning to Rutland next season keeps us going through the winter months.

This year, when the Ospreys have all gone, we have a special event planned to celebrate this particular season, and the success it has seen. On 18th September we will host a Fundraising Dinner and Dance in the name of Ospreys, to celebrate the amazing success of the project, and in particular the 100th chick to fledge! All money raised will go directly towards our work to protect Ospreys in the UK and Africa, and to educate, inspire and connect people of all ages with the wonder of Ospreys and Osprey migration.

We hope you all agree it is a very worthy cause, and that you can join us at this special event! The project is fortunate to have had the support throughout the years of hundreds of dedicated volunteers, and we are happy that many will be there to celebrate with us. We hope you can too!

For more information about this evening, please click here.

You can now book tickets online by clicking here! Alternatively, call 01572 737378.

S3 on the nest - what a beautiful scene

S3 was the 90th Rutland Osprey to fledge!

 

2 responses to “Don’t leave me this way”

  1. Sheila FE

    Well done Rutland team, you have had an amazing year. It has been a pleasure to watch Maya and Blue 33 raise their family – what a wonderful Dad he has proved to be – and to hear that other nests have been successful to. I hope your evening goes well and everyone has a lovely time. You all deserve it.

  2. marjorie mills

    I’ve watched this nest since there were 3 eggs and my husband and I visited the Manton Bay centre and even got our friends obsessed by watching. It’s been wonderful