Fighting fit

If you have been watching the webcam today, you’ll know that 33 has continued to prove his fishing prowess. Quite a bit of last night’s roach was left over on the nest this morning and 33 then delivered another huge roach that lasted most of the day. This ensured that all three chicks have had a good feed.

The two largest chicks are always first to be fed

The two largest chicks are always first to be fed

The two larger youngsters are always first to be fed, but the size of fish provided by 33 ensures that, once they have had their fill, there is still plenty left over for the smallest chick – who we know some of you have been worried about.

The fact there is so much fish on the nest means that the smallest chick always get a feed

The fact there is so much fish on the nest means that the smallest chick always gets a feed

As they get older Osprey chicks often become aggressive towards each other, and we saw the first signs of that today from the eldest and largest of the youngsters.

This kind of aggression is quite common among Osprey chicks and shouldn’t be a problem as long as 33 continues to provide enough fish. At nests where there isn’t enough food to go around, these kind of bullying tactics ensure that the largest chicks get most of the food and that smaller, submissive chicks suffer. Fortunately 33 is such a good provider that even the smallest chick should gain weight and be able to stand up for itself!

The oldest chick is already showing signs of being a bully!

The oldest chick is already showing signs of being a bully!

2 responses to “Fighting fit”

  1. Susan Welch

    I hate this time of development. No one likes to see bullying, and it’s a surprise that it happens in nature, although understandable.

  2. Lin

    Thank you for that Paul – you put my mind at ease regarding the ‘little one’ xx