Meet the WOW Ospreys

During the course of World Osprey Week we’re following the spring migration of several different Ospreys. Here’s an introduction to each of them.

You can check out the latest locations of the WOW Ospreys on our interactive map.

 

To find out more about WOW and the Osprey Flyways Project, click here.

 

European Ospreys

 

30(05)

30(05) photographed by John Wright at her wintering site in Senegal

30(05) photographed by John Wright at her wintering site in Senegal

30(05) is a female Osprey who fledged from the Site B nest at Rutland Water in central England in 2005. She first returned two years later and then bred successfully for the first time in 2009 at a nest known as Site K. To date she has raised a total of ten chicks.

In late January 2013 four members of the Rutland Osprey team travelled to Senegal to see her at her winter home. To find out more, click here. This spring 30 began he journey back to Rutland Water on 10th March and arrived home on 26th March. To read about her journey, click here.

 

Ilpo

Harri Koskinen checks Ilmari before he is released after being fitted with his satellite transmitter.

Harri Koskinen prepares to release a male Osprey after fitting it with a satellite transmitter

Ilpo is a seven-year-old Finnish male Osprey. He was fitted with GSM/GPS transmitter in July 2014 at his nest in southern Finland. That year Ilpo began his autumn migration on 3rd September and spent the winter in Guinea.

Last spring Ilpo arrived back to his nest much later than usual; ten days after his mate, Helena. Sadly they failed to breed successfully, and so Ilpo set-off on his autumn migration much earlier than usual, returning to the same wintering site in Guinea. This sring Ilpo began the long journey back to Finland on 16th March.

We are very grateful to Professor Pertti Saurola, the Osprey Foundation and and the Finnish Museum of Natural History for allowing us to include Ilpo in World Osprey Week.

Tero

Tero is a male Osprey from a nest in Lapland in northern Finland. He was fitted with a GSM/GPS transmitter on 26 July 2014. Tero set-off on his autumn migration on 29th August and took two months to reach his wintering site on the coast of Kenya. To read more about his migration, click here. Last summer he returned to Lapland and raised two healthy chicks with Seija. After again spending the winter in Kenya, he set-off on his spring migration this year on 28th March.

We are very grateful to Professor Pertti Saurola, the Osprey Foundation and and the Finnish Museum of Natural History for allowing us to include Tero in World Osprey Week.

Seija

Seija is Tero’s mate and she was also fitted with a GSM/GPS transmitter on 26 July 2014 at their nest in Lapland. She set off on her autumn migration on 29th August and spent the winter in the Ivory Coast.  To read more about her migration, click here. Last summer Seija raised two healthy chicks, before returning to her wintering site in the Ivory Coast. This spring she began her northward migration on 30th March.

We are very grateful to Professor Pertti Saurola, the Osprey Foundation and and the Finnish Museum of Natural History for allowing us to include Seija in World Osprey Week.

 

American Ospreys

Belle

Belle photographed on her first return to Martha's Vineyard.

Belle photographed by Mark Lovewell on her first return to Martha’s Vineyard.

Belle is a four year-old female Osprey from Massachusetts  in the United States . She was satellite-tagged by Rob Bierregaard as a fledgling at a nest on Lake Tashmoo on Martha’s Vineyard’s north shore on 28 July 2010.  She winters in Brazil near the Madeira River at the southern edge of the Amazon rainforest. This spring she began her northward migration on 4th March and arrived back at Martha’s Vineyard on 29th March. 

We are very grateful to Rob Bierregaard for allowing us to track Belle during World Osprey Week. To find out more about Rob’s Osprey migration studies in the United States, check out his website

 

Staddler

Staddler is the breeding male at a nest on a 10 foot high platform in the saltmarsh at Seabrook Harbor in New Hampshire. Ospreys originally nested on top of a duck blind before local resident Dave Weber installed a platform several years ago.  Staddler is named after the short wooden stakes which dot the saltmarshes of New England. These Staddles were used to hold platforms where harvested saltmarsh grass was stacked to dry. The weather-worn stakes still persist today and now provide perfect feeding perches for Ospreys.

Staddler was tagged by Rob Bierregaard in 2015

Staddler was tagged by Rob Bierregaard in 2015

Staddler was tagged by Iain MacLeod and Rob Bierregaard in 2015 and migrated to Brazil for the winter. This spring he set-off on the return journey to New Hampshire on 18th March. To find out more click here. We are very grateful to Iain MacLeod of the Squam Lakes Natural Science Center for allowing Staddler to be included on the map.
 
 
 
 

Previous WOW Ospreys

Sadly we have lost contact with some of the Ospreys that we have followed previously during WOW.

Blue XD

Blue XD photographed at Rothiemurchus Fishery by Neil Macgregor

Blue XD photographed at Rothiemurchus Fishery by Neil Macgregor

Blue XD is a male Scottish Osprey and was ringed as a two-year-old at Rothiemurchus Fishery, Scotland on 12th August 2000. Roy Dennis then re-found him as the breeding male at a nest near Carrbridge in 2002. He is regularly seen fishing at Rothiemurchus Fishery as well as on the River Findhorn near Tomation and at Lochindorb.  Last autumn Blue XD migrated to his usual wintering site beside the Casamance River in southern Senegal, but the satellite data suggests that, sadly, he died there in February. To find out more, check out Roy’s blog here.  Many thanks to Roy Dennis for allowing us to track Blue XD as part of WOW.

Helena

Helena was Ilpo’s mate and was also fitted with a GSM/GPS transmitter in July 2014. That autumn she migrated to Nigeria.  In spring 2015 she set-off on her northward migration on 16th March and arrived back at her nest in Finland on 14th April. Sadly she failed to breed successfully, and then died on her autumn migration after getting tangled in nets at a fish farm in Ukraine. You can read more about Helena’s story here. 

We are very grateful to Professor Pertti Saurola, the Osprey Foundation and and the Finnish Museum of Natural History for allowing us to follow Helena as part of World Osprey Week.

Donovan

Rob Bierregaard with Donovan shortly after he had fitted his satellite transmitter

Rob Bierregaard with Donovan shortly after he had fitted his satellite transmitter

Donovan is a male Osprey who nests near Tilton in New Hampshire in the United States. He was fitted with a satellite transmitter in May 2013. To find out more, click here. After spending his winter in Venezuela, Donovan set-off on his spring migration last year on 9th March and arrived back at his nest on 2nd April. He and his mate reared two healthy chicks. He then returned to Venezuela but his transmitter stopped sending data in November. Iain MacLeod still hopes that this may be due to transmitter failure, but there has been no sign of Donovan at his nest so far this spring. To read more about Donovan, click here.

We are very grateful to Iain MacLeod of the Squam Lakes Natural Science Center for allowing us to follow Donovan as part of WOW.

Donovan and Juliet (photograph by Iain MacLeod)

Donovan with his daughter, Juliet (photograph by Iain MacLeod)

North Fork Bob

North Fork Bob

North Folk Bob is from Long Island close to New York City in the United States

North Fork Bob was a male Osprey from New York in the United States. He was trapped and fitted with a satellite transmitter by Rob Bierregaard near Mattituck on Long Island on 1 May 2010. Bob spent his winters in the Guianan Shield highlands of southern Venezuela on the Ventuari River. To read more about his migrations, click here.  In spring 2015 Bob arrived back at Long Island on 21st April and went on to breed successfully for the first time. Very sadly, though, he then died in Florida on his autumn migration.

We are very grateful to Rob Bierregaard for allowing us to track Bob during WOW. To find out more about Rob’s Osprey migration studies in the United States, check out his website. 

One response to “Meet the WOW Ospreys”

  1. Paula Goldberg

    Greetings! I live in Beautiful Missoula Montana, USA. We have many Osprey here and have a large community of nest watchers. Our experience is enhanced 100-fold through the use of webcams that have been mounted above/besides a number of local nests allowing for 24/7 observation of these magnificent birds. I am writing you in the hopes of forming a connection and to make contact with your organizers of the WOW event. I am assisting a women named SuzAnne Miller who wants to possibly write an article about your project and WOW. We are also researching the idea of creating an Osprey Festival in conjunction with the 2016 WOW activities. For now, I am only asking for contact information on someone there who can help us by discussing the possibility of developing an associated event here in the US/Montana. Thank you in advance for your prompt reply and for all you do in the name of Osprey education and welfare around the world ~ Paula – heypaula@blackfoot.net – 406-543-7591

Leave a Reply