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Waiting for today to happen

Another lovely day today, and more of the same on the Osprey nest. The only thing we haven’t seen today is a fish! There’s still time for 33(11) to go fishing this evening though.

Together in the sun

Together in the sun

 

The Ospreys have been swapping over on the nest, taking turns to sit and preen and fly around behind the nest! Here’s a video of 33 doing just that.

33 on the T-perch

33 on the T-perch

 

Here’s a video of 33 preparing to incubate the eggs.

We know that 33 is very enthusiastic with his nest material, and today he’s brought in something new – two clumps of earth!

33 with clods

33 with clods

 

What a great addition to the nest they will be! Maya has been rearranging some of the sticks already present, and here are a couple of videos of her on the nest while 33 is incubating. In the first one, he looks unsure as to whether he should stand up or not. In the second one she stands on his tail, which speeds up his decision!

Maya and the eggs

Maya and the eggs

Both Ospreys looking settled on the nest

Both Ospreys looking settled on the nest

 

 

World Osprey Week update

The Manton Bay Ospreys may have been incubating eggs for more than a week, but elsewhere around the world Ospreys are still heading north on their spring migration.

Of the four Finnish Ospreys that we followed as part of World Osprey Week, only Helena has made it back to her nest site. Pertti Saurola reports that, having been there for more than a week, she seems to be growing tired of waiting for her mate, Ilpo, who is still some way from home, in northern Poland.  In recent days she has been on another nest, some 10 kilometres away. So there are sure to be fireworks when Ilpo finally returns! The latest data shows that the other Finnish birds, Tero and Seija are flying north through Russia and Poland respectively. To read more about the Finnish Ospreys, check out the website of the Finnish Museum of Natural History

Across the other side of the Atlantic, North Fork Bob is making slow progress as he heads back to Long Island – the latest data shows that he was in Pennsylvania earlier this week. His slow spring migration suggests that he is not interested in breeding this year. In contrast, Iain MacLeod from the Squam Lakes Natural Science Center reports that Donovan and his mate have eggs. She was sitting tight yesterday afternoon (in pouring rain) indicating that she has at least one egg. All of Donovan’s recent data shows that he is staying very close to home and finding plenty of fish along the Winnipesaukee River in Tilton. With a bit of luck he will have chicks at the end of May.

Donovan incubating at his nest in New Hampshire

Donovan incubating at his nest in New Hampshire

You can check out the latest locations of all of the World Osprey Week birds on our interactive map. Although WOW has now passed you can still register your school for the Osprey Flyways Project in order to make links with other schools who are studying Ospreys and to gain access to a huge range of free teaching resources. To sign-up click here.

On a day like today

We were blessed with another beautiful day today, the sort where you never want to see the sun go down. The sun has been out all day, and the reservoir has been as still and calm as a millpond. Here is the view from the Lyndon Centre today.

View from Lyndon Centre

View from Lyndon Centre

 

It’s great to see all the wild flowers beginning to bloom in the meadows – outside the Centre the cow-slips are looking fantastic.

Cow-slips outside centre

Cow-slips outside centre

 

It’s been a hot day on the nest today though, and both Ospreys have been panting as they sit in an attempt to cool down, and at one point during the day Maya went for a dip in the reservoir.

Maya panting in the heat

Maya panting in the heat

33 panting in the heat

33 panting in the heat

 

The pair have swapped over several times to incubate the eggs, and here’s another video of a change-over! I just love the little wobble they do to get comfortable when they first sit down.

Here is a video of Maya flying around during one of her breaks from incubation.

Later on, around half past four, 33 went fishing. It was a very short trip, and it was a very small fish! He ate his share and brought the rest to Maya, and in five minutes the fish was gone! This wasn’t the only fish of the day though, 33 brought one in this morning at about half past seven.

For some reason the video of 33 delivering the fish failed to work, but here is a video of Maya on the T-perch eating it.

So altogether another very settled day. Long may it continue!

Both on the nest together

Both on the nest together

Nice view

What a nice view to incubate to

 

Days like these

Days like today epitomise the way life is meant to be for Ospreys at this time of year! Today has played out much like yesterday, with a quiet peacefulness over the bay and the Ospreys behaving just as they know they should. It doesn’t get much better. There is a distinct sense of contentment radiating from the birds as they sit on the nest, incubating their three eggs. They are doing what their instinct dictates, and they are doing it perfectly. We cannot ask for more than that.

Togetherness

The Manton Bay pair sitting contentedly on their nest

 

Again they have been changing incubation shifts throughout the day, and not just when fish is brought in.

 

Speaking of fish, 33 has brought in two today. The first was a bit of a disappointment, due to the fact that it was so small…

33 delivers a tiny fish

33 delivers a tiny fish

Maya takes the little fish off 33

Maya takes the little fish off 33

And flies away with it

And flies away with it

 

However, he redeemed himself later by bringing in a huge trout!

Maya flies off with the great big fish

Maya flies off with the great big fish

 

Domestic bliss

In contrast to the goings-on at Site B this season, everything in Manton Bay has been going brilliantly, and today the domestic bliss continued. As of yesterday evening, the pair have three eggs, which is a full clutch for Maya. Both she and 33(11) have resolutely incubated their eggs throughout the day, swapping over regularly.

33 and the eggs

33 and the eggs

Maya wants to incubate

Maya wants to incubate

 

We saw 33 bring in a roach at about 1pm, which he took to the T-perch. He didn’t eat much of it though before he brought the rest to the female. She took it from him and went to the T-perch to finish it off, while he incubated the eggs.

33 with the fish

33 with the fish

Maya takes the fish

Maya takes the fish

It has been an altogether settled day, with beautiful weather to top it off. We hope it continues to go smoothly here in Manton Bay, and we have a nice peaceful incubation period. There’s only a few short weeks (well, five) to wait until we have chicks in the nest!

Both Ospreys on the nest

Both Ospreys on the nest