Osprey Tracking

Down in Manton Bay things are exceedingly quiet, we still have the two adult birds but no sign of any of the chicks. Elsewhere it looks as though Rutland birds are starting to leave the UK on their own migrations back to their wintering grounds. We will soon be updating you on 30s’ progress as she starts her fifth migration with a satellite tag! What an incredible bird!

On the subject of migration and satellite tags we have some very exciting news, a couple of weeks ago two of the finest osprey experts in the country, Roy Dennis and Tim Mackrill, both from the Roy Dennis Wildlife Foundation came down to Rutland to fit satellite trackers onto two birds. With the help of our own Lloyd Park, two male ospreys were selected: 4K(13) and S1(15), both of which have been holding territory but were unable to attract females this year. 

The tags fitted are the same as the one fitted to female 30, they weigh about 30g and will give detailed information on location, altitude and speed. The units are fitted to the birds like a small rucksack, allowing them to continue their normal activities.

This is very exciting news as it will allow us to follow these birds on their migration and also discover where they are overwintering, we will be sharing the information from the tags in the same way we share 30’s, on our interactive map and also in this blog. Aside from the scientific and conservation value of the tagging, the data provides an incredible educational resource and helps us to continue to link young people along the Osprey migration flyway. These latest tagged birds will form a key part of that work.

The two birds selected for tags this year were S1(15) you should recognise him, as he is a Manton Bay chick, who first returned in 2017, and 4K(13) who is from a site on private land and first returned to Rutland in 2015.

S1

S1

4K

4K

In fact S1 the youngest bird has already set off on his migration! At 14:00 on the 25th of August he left the UK crossing the English Channel between Brighton and Newhaven. By 17:00 he was in France. After what must have been a tiring crossing he stopped off overnight in woodland just east of Le Havre, in just one day he managed to clock up an amazing 377.98 km.

S1 25th August

On the 26th S1 continued his travels south, not stopping until he found another large piece of woodland east of Tours, and rested there overnight. The next morning he was back in skies, by now he must have been getting hungry, he only covered just less than 100 km before he found himself a nice lake north of Le Blanc to catch some dinner and rest up.

S1 26th- 27th August

S1 27th – 28th


 

Fishing spot north of Le Blanc

The break and food did its trick, as the next day he was off like a rocket, he made his way south-west towards the coastline and the Gironde estuary, a popular spot for migrating birds. S1 then continued on towards Arcachon Bay, stopping only when he found a large spot of woodland to the south-east of the bay.

S1 28th-29th August

Arcachon Bay S1

The next day S1 headed back towards the coastline, it looks as though he could have then used the coastline as a guide, as he follows it straight down until he reached the Pyrenees. From here he headed south east, and on the 30th of August passed over Madrid. Our last update from S1 showed him just south Madrid, over the past 5 days he has covered an amazing 1535.78 km. It’s really intriguing to see where he will end up; at this point in time it doesn’t look as though he is heading for Portugal, where some Rutland birds have been spotted over wintering, so most likely he is heading down to West Africa, just like 30.

S1 29th-30th August

The data from 4K and 30 show that both birds are still in Rutland, we hope to update you on their movements and add S1s’ migration onto the interactive map in the next few days.