Over the mountains

The latest data from 30(05)’s tracker shows that she is now in Morocco, just north of the Atlas mountains! Before the new data came in this morning, the latest information we had for 30 was her roost site on 14th March (see map below, or click here). In the two days since then, she has travelled a further 536 miles (864km).

17th March progress

30 avoided most of Western Sahara, just skirting the corner of it, before entering Morocco. She traversed the Atlas mountains at an average altitude of 2,500m. Her position as of 8pm last night (16th March) was 6 miles (10km) north-east of Fquih Ben Salah.

Position 16th March

Here are some photographs that John Wright took from the aeroplane on the way to Africa this season – these are places that 30 has flown over on her journey home!

Lake close to 30's latest roost site

Lake close to 30’s latest roost site

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Morocco

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Morocco – amazing land formation

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Plane over the Sahara

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Atlas mountains – 30 flew over these on Wednesday

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Guelmim Es Semara

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Ridge that 30 followed

 

In 2014, 30 took a total of 11 days to return to Rutland! This year, she is currently 236 miles (381km) further ahead of her position on this date in 2014. If she continues in the same vein, she could beat her record!

Here is a map comparing 30’s three northward migrations.

Blue = 2014

Green = 2015

Red = 2016

Comparison up to 16th march 2016

As you can see, 2014 and 2016 are fairly similar, but she took a rather different route in 2015. This was due largely to the weather – strong winds frequently blew her off course and she struggled to make progress. Over years of satellite-tracking studies and data analysis of migration patterns, we have learned that Ospreys generally, where possible, attempt to travel a similar route to previous years. However, things like weather can seriously affect the ability of the birds to do this, and they have to alter their direction accordingly.

30 has migrated a total of 20 times in her lifetime so far. We are confident that she knows exactly what she’s doing, and are looking forward to the day she arrives back in Rutland again – it might not be long!

Click here to follow 30’s journey on our special map.

Alternatively, click here to follow 30 using Google Earth.

 

2 responses to “Over the mountains”

  1. Mike Simmonds

    Thank you Kayleigh.

  2. Ruth Barnes

    Takes your breath the awesome journeys these birds take, really looking forward to her arriving safely. Thanks to all the team that evaluate the data, and God speed 30