Paving the way forward

A pleasant day was had by all here at the Lyndon Centre today. The weather was lovely, and a record number of visitors flocked to see the Ospreys and hear all about the dramatic Manton Bay story of 2014! 33(11) and Maya put on a good show for folks down in the hide, 33 fishing in the Bay again, and bringing more enormous sticks to the nest!

Before I get ahead of myself with Osprey news, here is the promised video of the stoat from yesterday! Many thanks to Jan Warren for being on-hand with the camera and allowing us to use this footage.

33(11) has made a much more concerted effort with mating today. At the moment he is fairly consistently unsuccessful, but he’s trying his best, and Maya is allowing him to do so. All this is a good sign, if he perseveres and gets the hang of it, and she continues to be receptive, there is still a chance she could re-lay. As I said before, we’re not ruling anything out. We must just watch and wait!

33 falling off Maya's back

33 falling off Maya’s back

You are the wind beneath my wings

You are the wind beneath my wings

33 enjoying the elevated view

33 enjoying the elevated view

 

The eggs have finally gone completely from the nest cup, with no chance of another one falling in! One is still visible (occasionally, depending on stick placement) on the right-hand-side of the nest. A crow took off with one of them today when the Ospreys were away, and the other was removed by the female, after either the Ospreys or a stick broke it. We knew that there was no chance for these eggs even if they remained in the nest cup, so their absence is a good thing. It means that Maya can hopefully return to the state of mind that tells her she must produce eggs, because there aren’t any in the nest.

28(10) was not seen today, but he could still be around somewhere. It is unlikely that he will make a comeback and try to fight for this nest. From the beginning he seemed to understand that he is no match for 33. There is every chance that in the future, 28 will breed at Rutland Water, but not on such a high-profile nest!

Photographs from our superlative Field Officer John Wright tomorrow!