Rutland Ospreys in Africa

Every time I download the latest satellite tracking data from 30(05)’s GPS transmitter it never ceases to amaze me. She’s wintering almost 3000 miles away on the Senegalese coast and yet I can tell you exactly where she roosted last night. Remarkable!

As we have come to expect, the latest batch of GPS fixes show that 30 has remained faithful to the same short section of coastline just south of the fishing village of Tiougoune, midway between Dakar and St Louis. She follows the same daily routine each day; catching a fish soon after first light and then spending most of the day perched on the beach. She then roosts in trees about 100 metres inland. To find out more about here winter home, click here.

The latest data shows that 30 is settled on the usual  short section of Senegalese coastline

The latest data shows that 30 is settled on the usual short section of Senegalese coastline

Although 30(05) is the only Osprey we’re currently satellite-tracking, we do know where another Rutland bird is spending the winter – and the bird in question happens to be 30’s daughter! Last December Osprey project volunteer Chris Wood was thrilled to see 5F(12) in The Gambia. He identified her at Tanji Marsh, a site that myself and the project team know very well from our trips to Gambia and Senegal. At the time 5F was too young to have returned to the UK, but it was really encouraging to know that she had at made it to Africa.

Given that most young Ospreys first return to the UK at two years of age, we hoped to see 5F at Rutland Water this summer. Although that never happened, I received the exciting news yesterday that she is now back at Tanji Marsh. Chris Wood is in The Gambia again and he’s sent us a series of photos of 5F that he took at the marsh yesterday. This is really exciting news because it suggests that she is now settled at Tanji, just as her mother is on the Senegal coast. Well done, Chris!

You can clearly read 5F's blue ring in this photo

5F(12) at Tanji Marsh yesterday

5F at Tanji 2

5F Tanji

It is great to know where one of the Rutland birds is spending the winter, but the fact that 5F has settled at Tanji is particularly significant. The Gambian fishing village is where we initiated the Osprey Flyways Project in 2011 and, as a result, we have strong links with Tanji Lower Basic School. We have recently installed a suit of computers in the school thanks to funding from Melton Mowbrary Rotary club and the school have even named one of their football teams ‘the Ospreys’!

Some of the computers we recently installed at Tanji Lower Basic School

Some of the computers we recently installed at Tanji Lower Basic School

Children at Tanji Lower Basic school wearing football kits donated by two Rutland schools

Children at Tanji Lower Basic school wearing football kits donated by two Rutland schools

The computers will allow children at Tanji to participate in World Osprey Week in March – and now that we know there is a Rutland Osprey within a short walk from the school, that takes on even more significance. Exciting times indeed!

We are always looking for ways to raise money for the Osprey Flyways Project and, with this in mind, I’m joining a team from IEPUK to run the Stamford Santa Fun Run. This involves running 5km dressed as Santa! If you would like to sponsor us, you can do so here. Any money raised will go towards our work in Gambia.Thanks to George Peach and IEPUK for their continued support of the project.