The wind beneath her wings

Exciting news from Site B! 7K(14), the female chick and the larger of the two, fledged yesterday!

Juvenile Ospreys usually fledge at about seven or eight weeks old. After we ringed the Site B chicks two weeks ago, we knew it wouldn’t be long before they took their very first flights. In the last two weeks the chicks have been exercising their wings, flapping a lot and hovering above the nest, preparing their muscles for their first real test.

Luckily for me, I was able to take some time this morning to visit Site B. The two chicks were on the nest, 03(97) was keeping watch from a nearby perch, and the female was away somewhere. For a while the chicks sat happily preening in the much welcomed sunshine. The female came in with a twig, then left again. Eventually 7K seemed to decide that was enough sitting around! She stretched her nearly fully-grown wings and swooped off the nest. She circled the area for about a minute, dipping and rising, flapping and soaring, looking like she was thoroughly enjoying herself! Then she landed, fairly gracefully, next to her Dad on the T-perch.

Naturally, juveniles can be a bit unsteady on their first few flights, and landing can be tricky for a while until they get the hang of it! It doesn’t take long though for them to become proficient. 7K looks like she is becoming very quickly adept at this flying and landing lark! It shouldn’t be long before 6K joins his sister in the air.

In Manton Bay, Maya and 33(11) still remain faithful to their nest, and have been sitting in the Bay and flying back and forth all day, providing great views for people visiting in either Waderscrape or Shallow Water hide. Recently there have been several other Ospreys spotted in the Bay in addition to Maya and 33(11). Today there were three intruding Ospreys, whose identities are unknown. Yesterday, we had two intruding birds, and they were identified as 28(10) – identifiable by his damaged right wing, and 30(05) – identifiable by her satellite transmitter aerial. It is great to see that 28(10) and 30(05) are still in the area and haven’t disappeared elsewhere. Hopefully next year these two individuals will breed! Not necessarily together, but that is also a possibility!

Unfortunately we are still having issues with our live camera. It was working for a while on Thursday, and here are some videos and photos that we took that day. 33(11) sat on the nest for quite a while that afternoon, standing around quite happily in the breeze, and he even had another go at incubating nothing! Keep up the good work for next season, 33!

33(11) hanging out on the nest

33(11) hanging out on the nest

33(11) happily sitting on nothing

33(11) incubating nothing again!

33(11) incubating nothing again!

33(11) happily sitting on nothing

33(11) standing on one leg

33(11) standing on one leg

 

 

One response to “The wind beneath her wings”

  1. Angela Millie

    Thank you Kayleigh for all the information updates you provide. It must be extremely difficult for you when there isn’t the progress of chicks to follow at Manton Bay, but you always seem to find something to interest the osprey fan club!