The WOW Ospreys are off!

We are now just over a week away from the first-ever World Osprey Week, but don’t worry, there is still plenty of time for your school to get involved! Click here to find out how.

During WOW all of our satellite-tagged Ospreys should be heading north on their amazing journeys. Excitingly, two have already set-off on the long flight north.

Yesterday we reported that 30(05) left her winter home on the Senegal coast on Tuesday afternoon. By 7pm that evening she had flown 128 miles north-east and was roosting in northern Senegal near Reserve Sylvo Pastorale Des Six Forages. We should receive the next batch of data from her satellite transmitter over the weekend. By then she should be crossing the vast wilds of the Sahara. We wonder how far she will have flown? Last autumn it took 30 just 12 days to fly from her nest near Rutland Water to the Senegalese coast – so if she makes similarly quick progress north, she should arrive back in Rutland during World Osprey Week!

30(05) spent her winter on a beach in Senegal, but now she is flying north again.

30(05) spent her winter on a beach in Senegal, but now she is flying north again.

Over the other side of the Atlantic another of the WOW Ospreys has also begun heading north. Donovan has spent his winter beside the Rio Claro, just north of the Orinoco River (remember Uncle Orinoco of the Wombles?) in Venezuela. He left mid-morning on Monday and by yesterday afternoon he had flown 350 miles north to the Venezuelan coast. Not content with that he continued north and by 7:30pm was a third of the way (another 150 miles) across the Caribbean sea. It will be fascinating to see how far north he has flown by World Osprey Week. Donovan nests in New Hampshire in the United States and Iain MacLeod reports that there is still snow covering his nest and the state is in the midst of another blizzard right now. His autumn migration took just over a month, and given the weather conditions at home, we hope that Donovan doesn’t rush his flight north this spring! You can find out more about Donovan on the Squam Lakes Natural Science Center website, by clicking here, and follow Iain’s up to the minute twitter feed @OspreyNH.

Donovan often visited the Rio Capanaparo to fish during his winter stay in Venezuela

Donovan often visited the Rio Capanaparo to fish during his winter stay in Venezuela

Over the coming week we’ll be providing regular updates on the progress of our WOW Ospreys, and  you can also check out their current locations on our interactive map.

Click here to view the WOW map with the latest positions of our satellite-tagged Ospreys – including 30 and Donovan.

To read about all the Ospreys we’ll be tracking during WOW, click here.