Whatever next?

What a beautiful day it has been today! The sun has been shining, brimstones, green-veined whites and orange-tips have been fluttering around, violets, bugles and primroses are flowering in the verges, and there is the wonderful scent of wild garlic as you walk past the gate. The view from the Centre windows has been, as always, a sight to behold, with tree sparrows, yellowhammers, goldfinches and reed buntings amassing on the feeders, and kestrels flying back and forth across the meadow, which is now carpeted in cow-slips.

If you visited the Centre today, and had not read about our recent troubles at the Osprey nest, you could be forgiven for thinking that nothing had gone wrong. Today gave the impression of domestic bliss. 28 arrived at the nest this morning with a fish, which Maya then took away to eat. He looked a little nervous at first, but then began to incubate the eggs!

28 incubating!

28 incubating!

28 and Maya on the nest together

28 and Maya on the nest together

 

Yesterday, the last we saw of both 28 and 33 was a confrontation they had above the nest in the morning. Here are John Wright’s photos of their encounter.

28 taking evasive action as 33 dives at the nest

28 taking evasive action as 33 dives at the nest

28 avoiding 33

28 avoiding 33

33 on the left, 28 on the right

33 on the left, 28 on the right

33 left, 28 right

33 left, 28 right

33 and 28 above nest

33 and 28 above nest

33 above the female

33 above the female

33 hovering above Maya

33 hovering above Maya

Maya on the perch

Maya on the perch

Greater black-backed gull mobbing the female, probably after her fish

Greater black-backed gull mobbing the female, probably after her fish

Greater black-backed gull having another go

Greater black-backed gull having another go

 

At this point in time, there are more questions than answers. Has 33 finally gotten the message, or will he come back? Has he found his own territory? Is it too late for these eggs? If so, how long will Maya continue to incubate, and will 28 spend the rest of the summer with her? These are questions that we just cannot answer right now. Only time will tell, and when it does, rest assured we will tell you.

 

 

 

8 responses to “Whatever next?”

  1. BarbaraMc

    I’ve got absolutely everything crossed that I can cross !

  2. cirrus

    Me too Barbara, I so want 28 and Maya to succeed Wonderful captures of the dog fight ! great bog, Thank yoy

  3. Theresa Moore

    So it looks like good news for the eggs. I I live in Perth Australia and have been following the adventures. Fantastic pictures today. Well done all of you

  4. Dolly Cox

    I’ve got everything crossed too. I think 28 has the right intentions, but 33 11 is really giving him grief.

    Good luck Maya, for the eggs. 28 please feed her this morning!

  5. A.Neville

    If the eggs are believed to have failed then would an option be to remove the eggs in the hope that a second clutch could be laid while there is still time? Also eggs can be left for a surprisingly long time and still be successful depending on stage of development.

    1. Tim

      At present we do not think that removing the eggs is a viable option. Aside from the fact that we would need to apply for the relevant licence from Natural England, there is too much uncertainty with the birds. Although there is a chance that the female would re-lay, the fact that 28 has been so unreliable thus far, would mean that even if Maya did re-lay, we may just end up in the same situation. Likewise, should the eggs hatch, we can’t guarantee that the chicks would survive (because 28 has been a poor provider of fish so far). In this case the immaturity of both 28 and 33 means that we are probably best to let nature take its course and hope that one of the two birds forms a strong pair-bond with Maya this year. If this happens, they are much more likely to be successful next year. That said, it is very frustrating for everyone (staff and volunteers) having to stand-back and watch it all happen! Tim

  6. Nita

    As 28 has returned – hopefully for good – and is still mating with Maya, it is possible that she could lay another egg which might hatch successfully, or is three the usual limit? Thanks to the team for all the updates and I share your frustration and disappointment!

    1. Tim

      Hi Anita,
      Three is usually the limit – although, very occasionally, some females do lay 4 eggs. It is too late for a fourth egg at the Manton Bay nest now though.
      Best wishes
      Tim