When will 30 head home?

It is felt a little more Spring-like at Rutland Water in recent days and it won’t be long before the first Sand Martins will be zipping back and forth over the reservoir. We know from satellite tracking studies that the earliest-arriving Ospreys will be beginning their northward migration in the next few days and so checking 30(05)’s latest satellite data is always more exciting at this time of year. The latest data shows that she is still at her wintering site on the Senegalese coast and, in reality, she probably won’t begin the long journey back to Rutland Water until the second week in March. Rest-assured we will let you know as soon as she sets-off!

The data for the last 10 days shows that 30 is still settled at her wintering site

The data for the last 10 days shows that 30 is still settled at her wintering site

The Senegalese coastline between Dakar and St Louis supports a large wintering population of Ospreys and, as we know from last winter’s visit to Senegal by members of the project team, 30 spends her winter in the company of many other Ospreys. In recent weeks one of the birds she is likely to have come into contact with is UV: a first winter juvenile male from Northumberland. Joanna Dailey has kindly sent UV’s data from 23 February and it shows that he skirted around 30’s winter territory. Having watched the interactions between adult and juvenile Ospreys in Africa this is to be expected; most juveniles learn that they can not mess with established wintering birds, such as 30! For more on UV’s travels in Senegal, check out the Kielder Ospreys excellent blog.

The data from UV's transmitter showed how he avoided 30's winter territory

The data from UV’s transmitter showed how he avoided 30’s winter territory on Monday this week (image courtesy of Forestry Commission England)

30 is one of the Ospreys that we’ll be following during World Osprey Week from 23-29 March this year. You can see the latest locations of the WOW Ospreys on our new interactive map.

Children at Provo Primary School in the Turks and Caicos ISlands learning about Ospreys during WOW in 2014

Children at Provo Primary School in the Turks and Caicos Islands learning about Ospreys during WOW in 2014

Closer to home preparations are nearing completion for the new Osprey season at Rutland Water. We’ll have a brand new Osprey viewing hide thanks to generous funding from Caterpillar and a new and improved webcam thanks to the Martin Lawrence Memorial Trust. More details soon!

The new Osprey hide opens on 14th March

The new Osprey hide opens on 14th March

2 responses to “When will 30 head home?”

  1. Sheila Elliott

    How fascinating to see the route of two birds from completely different areas together on one map. UV has been fun to follow. It won’t be long before they start arriving on our shores once more!

  2. Tiger Mozone

    30 (05) has clearly found a safe wintering site. Now she has been joined in the area by the Kielder juvenile UV it will be interesting if he finds it equally safe. This could be really important scientifically as it should give insight as to why so many juvenile ospreys come to harm.